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LETTERS TO EDITOR
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 154-155

Authors' reply to Ventrapati


Department of Surgical Oncology, Yenepoya Medical College Hospital, Deralakatte, Karnataka, India

Date of Submission08-Feb-2021
Date of Decision24-Feb-2021
Date of Acceptance02-Mar-2021
Date of Web Publication26-Mar-2021

Correspondence Address:
Rohan Thomas Mathew
Department of Surgical Oncology, Yenepoya Medical College Hospital, Derlakatte, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/crst.crst_35_21

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How to cite this article:
Mathew RT, Shetty R, Vijayakumar M. Authors' reply to Ventrapati. Cancer Res Stat Treat 2021;4:154-5

How to cite this URL:
Mathew RT, Shetty R, Vijayakumar M. Authors' reply to Ventrapati. Cancer Res Stat Treat [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Apr 23];4:154-5. Available from: https://www.crstonline.com/text.asp?2021/4/1/154/312088



We are thankful to Dr. Ventrapati[1] for his comments on our article titled, “Incidence and pattern of distribution of cancer in India: A secondary data analysis from six population-based cancer registries.”[2] We agree with Dr. Ventrapati about the need to designate cancer as a notifiable disease. Although it has already been designated as a notifiable disease in a few Indian states and union territories, including Karnataka, West Bengal, and Punjab,[3] it is still widely underreported. In 2017, the Government of India's Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MOHFW) announced that it will not classify cancer as a notifiable disease as the National Cancer Registry program run by the National Centre for Disease Informatics and Research (NCDIR) generates enough data for formulating cancer-related policies.[4] Therefore, to improve the reporting of the actual cancer incidence and prevalence in our country, the central government must urge the individual states to designate cancer as a notifiable disease. The solution that Dr. Ventrapati proposes is to establish more cancer registries, particularly in the rural areas. The MOHFW through the NCDIR should establish and support hospital- or population-based cancer registries along with the medical institutions in the country as they have good infrastructure to identify and report cancer cases.[5],[6] However, having too many cancer registries can be counterproductive if the same case is registered multiple times when the patient moves from one center to another. Therefore, a central database with unique identification for all the patients with cancer will help not only in maintaining a registry, but also in maintaining the continuum of care.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Ventrapati P. Time for cancer to be designated as a notifiable disease in India. Cancer Res Stat Treat 2021;4:153-4.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Shetty R, Mathew RT, Vijayakumar M. Incidence and pattern of distribution of cancer in India: A secondary data analysis from six population-based cancer registries. Cancer Res Stat Treat 2020;3:678-82.  Back to cited text no. 2
  [Full text]  
3.
4.
Available from: https://pib.gov.in/newsite/PrintRelease.aspx?relid=159217. [Last accessed on 2021 Feb 06].  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Sahoo SS, Verma M, Parija PP. An overview of cancer registration in India: Present status and future challenges. Oncol J India 2018;2:86-9.  Back to cited text no. 5
  [Full text]  
6.
Noronha V. Making a case for cancer research in India. Cancer Res Stat Treat 2018;1:71-4.  Back to cited text no. 6
  [Full text]  




 

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